9. Physical Data

Population, Land Use, Public Administrative Boundaries and Infrastructure



This chapter contains population, land use, public administrative boundaries and infrastructure data.
 

9.1 Introduction

Estimates of population and housing units were based on estimated percentage allocations of population by census tract within the Compatible Growth Area and Core Preservation Areas of the Central Pine Barrens. These allocations are based on numerous sources, including: the most recent Pine Barrens land use map for Brookhaven Town (Suffolk County Water Authority); 1990 Census of Population and Housing data including 1990 census tract and block maps and 1980, 1970, and 1960 census tract maps (US Department of Commerce); maps from Land Use 1981 (Long Island Regional Planning Board); pine barrens zones lot map (Suffolk County Water Authority); and the multi-unit housing complex inventory maintained by the Suffolk County Planning Department.
 

9.2 Historic and Current Population

9.2.1 1990 Population Estimates

The 1990 population of the Central Pine Barrens area is estimated to be 57,207. The total population of the Central Pine Barrens comprises 4.3% of Suffolk County's population and occupies 17% of Suffolk's land area.

The number of residents in the Central Pine Barrens has increased dramatically over the past thirty years. The following tables detail that population growth.

Figure 9-1: Central Pine Barrens Population by Town, 1960-1990
Brookhaven Riverhead Southampton TOTAL
1960 8,466 436 3,623 12,525
1970 18,278 792 4,134 23,204
1980 36,444 1,090 5,471 43,005
1990 49,719 1,303 6,185 57,207

The Brookhaven Town portion of the Pine Barrens Plan area contains the largest portion of the population with 49,719 persons, or 87% of the total Pine Barrens population. The Southampton portion of the Pine Barrens contains 6,185 persons, representing 11% of the population in the Pine Barrens. Riverhead contains 1,303 Pine Barrens residents who account for the remaining 2% of the Pine Barrens population.

The following table shows the percentage increase in population in the Central Pine Barrens, by decade since 1990, for each town.

Figure 9-2: Central Pine Barrens Population by Town, Percent Increase by Decade, 1960-1990
Brookhaven Riverhead Southampton TOTAL
1960-1970 115.9% 81.7% 14.1% 85.3%
1970-1980 99.4% 37.6% 32.3% 85.3%
1980-1990 36.4% 19.5% 13.1% 33.0%

One of the largest population increases in the Central Pine Barrens occurred between 1970 and 1980, when the area added nearly 20,000 residents, thus increasing the population by 85%. Growth during the 1980's was also strong. The population of the Central Pine Barrens increased by over 14,000 persons, or 33%, from 1980 to 1990. In each of the past three decades, population growth in the Central Pine Barrens has been fastest in the portion in the Town of Brookhaven.

The Central Pine Barrens 1990 population total of 57,207 is comprised of 53,295 (93%) in the Compatible Growth Area, and 3,912 (7%) in the Core Preservation Area. The following table details the population totals by Core Preservation Area and Compatible Growth Area for each town in the Central Pine Barrens.

Figure 9-3: Population in the Core Preservation Area, Compatible Growth Area and the Total Central Pine Barrens by Town, 1990
Brookhaven Riverhead Southampton TOTAL
Core Preservation Area 2,327 346 1,239 3,912
Compatible Growth Area 47,392 957 4,946 53,295
CENTRAL PINE BARRENS 49,719 1,303 6,185 57,207

The largest population in the Core Preservation Area is found in parts of eastern Manorville, the part of Calverton that is in Brookhaven Town, Ridge, Riverside, Flanders, and Westhampton. The communities with the largest populations in the Compatible Growth Area are Coram, Ridge, Middle Island, and Manorville.

9.2.2 1993 Population Estimates

The Long Island Lighting Company (LILCO) produced population estimates by community as of January 1, 1993. Based on those estimates, 1993 population estimates were generated for the total Central Pine Barrens region. Between 1990 and 1993, the population in the Central Pine Barrens is estimated to have increased by 2,334 to 59,541, for a three year increase of 4.1%.

Since LILCO's population estimates are performed on the community level and not on the smaller census tract level, it is difficult to pinpoint where the population is changing. However, based on available data, it seems that most of the 1990-1993 population increase occurred in Manorville. Less significant growth also occurred in Gordon Heights and in Middle Island.
 
 
9.3 Population Density

Brookhaven's population in the Central Pine Barrens represents 87% of the total population in the Central Pine Barrens, yet only 60% of the land area of the Central Pine Barrens lies in Brookhaven. This fact indicates that the population density in the Brookhaven portion of the Pine Barrens is greater than that in the other two Pine Barrens towns. The following table details the population density for each part of the Central Pine Barrens.

Figure 9-4: Population Density in the Core Preservation Area, the Compatible Growth Area and the Total Central Pine Barrens by Town, 1990 (Persons Per Square Mile)
Brookhaven Riverhead Southampton TOTAL
Core Preservation Area 57 47 37 48
Compatible Growth Area 886 112 402 717
CENTRAL PINE BARRENS 526 82 135 366

The entire town of Brookhaven has a 1990 population density of 1,573 persons per square mile, while Suffolk County's density is 1,451 persons per square mile. The Brookhaven portion of the Central Pine Barrens contains the highest population density in the Core Preservation Area, Compatible Growth Area and the entire Central Pine Barrens areas. Population densities overall are about 15 times greater in the Compatible Growth Area than in the Core Preservation Area.
 

9.4 Housing

The total number of housing units in the Central Pine Barrens was estimated to be 23,180 in 1990. This figure represents 4.8% of all housing units in Suffolk County. As the population in the Central Pine Barrens has grown, so too has its number of housing units, as the following table shows.

Figure 9-5: Central Pine Barrens Housing Units by Town, 1960-1990
Brookhaven Riverhead Southampton TOTAL
1960 4,492 300 1,661 6,453
1970 6,413 411 1,994 8,818
1980 14,131 517 2,507 17,154
1990 19,661 583 2,936 23,180

Brookhaven's 19,661 housing units again account for the largest percentage of housing units in the Central Pine Barrens (85%). Southampton's share of housing units stands at almost 13%, and Riverhead has just under 3% of the Central Pine Barrens' total housing units. The growth in the number of housing units in the Pine Barrens has been the most dramatic in the Town of Brookhaven.

The Central Pine Barrens 1990 housing unit count of 23,180 is comprised of 21,465 (93%) in the Compatible Growth Area, and 1,715 (7%) in the Core Preservation Area. The following table specifies the 1990 housing unit totals by Core Preservation Area and Compatible Growth Area for each town in the Central Pine Barrens.

Figure 9-6: Housing Units in the Core Preservation Area, Compatible Growth Area and the Total Central Pine Barrens by Town, 1990
Brookhaven Riverhead Southampton TOTAL
Core Preservation Area 902 197 616 1,175
Compatible Growth Area 18,760 386 2,320 21,465
CENTRAL PINE BARRENS 19,661 583 2,936 23,180

As is the case with population, most of the housing units in the Central Pine Barrens are concentrated in the Compatible Growth Area in Brookhaven Town.

9.4.1 Multi-Unit Housing

According to an inventory maintained by the Suffolk County Planning Department, there are 29 multi-unit housing complexes (condominiums, apartment complexes, co-ops) situated in the Central Pine Barrens. All of these complexes are located in the Town of Brookhaven and only one of the complexes, Calverton Hills in Calverton, is located in the Core Preservation Area. Collectively, all of these multi-unit housing complexes contain 11,464 housing units.

A significant portion of the housing in the Brookhaven portion of the Central Pine Barrens is in multi-unit housing complexes. A comparison of those complexes built as of 1990 with the total number of housing units from the 1990 Census shows that 51% of the housing units in the Brookhaven portion of the Central Pine Barrens are in multi-unit complexes (9,951 out of 19,661 housing units). In the entire Central Pine Barrens, 43% of the 23,180 housing units are in multi-unit complexes.

9.4.2 Seasonal Housing

Of the 23,180 housing units in the Central Pine Barrens, an estimated 885 or about 4% are seasonal housing units. Approximately 200 or nearly one quarter of those seasonal homes are estimated to be in the Core Preservation Area.

The presence of seasonal housing adds to the population estimate for the Central Pine Barrens during peak seasonal times (usually the summer season). At an estimated four persons per household in seasonal homes, the population in the Central Pine Barrens can be expected to rise by about 3,500 (about 6%) at peak seasonal times. Guests in year-round housing units, motels, and campsites also add to the seasonal population.

9.4.3 Housing Value

Several crude methods were used to estimate housing values in the Central Pine Barrens. The 1990 Census yielded figures on median housing values of owner-occupied housing units by census tract. A median housing value in the Central Pine Barrens was approximated using those medians. Based on the 1990 census tracts included in the Central Pine Barrens, the median of those median values was approximately $137,500. When only those census tracts with more than 50% of their population in the Pine Barrens were included, the resulting median value was again about $137,500.

Another method was used to approximate housing values in the Pine Barrens. A weighted average of housing units and their corresponding median values was calculated, yielding a median value of $138,228. It is therefore reasonable to say that the median 1990 owner-occupied housing value in the Central Pine Barrens was approximately $138,000. This figure is almost 17% lower than the Suffolk County median of $165,900 and 6% lower than the entire town of Brookhaven's median housing value of $147,200.
 

9.5 Income

Per capita income in the Central Pine Barrens is lower than income in Suffolk County as a whole. Based on the 1990 Census data, the overall Central Pine Barrens per capita income is estimated to be $15,837 in 1989. This figure is 14% lower than the Suffolk County 1989 per capita income of $18,481 and 4% lower than the Brookhaven Town figure of $16,441.

 
9.6 Public Administrative Boundaries - Municipal, School District and other boundaries

Maps containing the following information exist in various public offices:

1. Boundaries of towns, villages, school districts are on the Suffolk County Planning Department geographic information system.

2. The boundaries of all fire districts in the pine barrens have been plotted by hand in red on parcel specific maps (1"=1,000') that had been used for the Special Groundwater Protection Area (SGPA) Study. The source of this information is the most recent Suffolk County tax map books.

3. The water districts appearing on the Suffolk County tax maps have been plotted on the 1"=1,000' maps.

4. A map of Suffolk County sewer districts (SCSD) shows only three districts within the Pine Barrens; SCSD #11 (small parts of which lie on the extreme western part of the Pine Barrens) which has been accounted for on a parcel-by-parcel basis using Tax Map books; and SCSD #23 in Middle Island which does not appear in the tax map books; SCSD #8 for one neighborhood in Ridge which has been noted on a parcel-by-parcel basis.

5. Separate lighting districts do exist within the Town of Southampton. The Town of Southampton Highway Department stated that their department, which covers street lighting, has no maps of these districts. Brookhaven and Riverhead have town-wide lighting districts.

6. Agricultural districts are plotted on the same maps as fire and sewer districts.

7. Ambulance districts exist in Southampton Town and Brookhaven Town.

Southampton and Riverhead Towns have their own police forces, as do the villages of Quogue and Westhampton Beach. Brookhaven Town is part of the Suffolk County Police District.

There are no park districts in the Pine Barrens area

Figure 9-7: Public Administrative Bodies in the Central Pine Barrens
(Please see the printed version of the Plan for this illustration.)

 
9.7 Land Use within the Central Pine Barrens

One of the first steps in the planning process is the determination of existing conditions, and an inventory and analysis of existing land is a key component of those existing conditions. Information concerning land use provides basic data on land characteristics and the various activities that occupy land in the planning area. Land use analysis helps in examining development patterns and planning for future development and open space preservation.

Each tax map parcel in the Central Pine Barrens had originally been assigned one of dozens of three digit land use codes, based on local assessment information. After a limited number of alterations, each of those land use codes was allocated to one of eleven distinct land use categories. Those categories are agriculture, residential, vacant, commercial, recreation and open space, institutional, industrial, utilities, transportation, waste handling and management and surface waters.

The tax map parcel acreage of the Central Pine Barrens totals 93,470 acres. This figure excludes acreage of road rights of way which are generally not assigned a tax map lot number. Two land use categories account for nearly two thirds of the land in the Central Pine Barrens. These major land uses are vacant land, comprising 35,260 acres (37.7% of the total) and recreation and open space with 25,031 acres or 26.8% of all land in the Central Pine Barrens. Less significant uses include residential (11,599 acres or 12.4%), institutional (10,410 acres or 11.1%) and agricultural uses (4,601 acres, or 4.9%). About half of the acreage in institutional use is contained within the Brookhaven National Laboratory.

Figure 9-8: Top Five Land Use Categories: Acreage and Percent of Total Land Area for Parcels in the Central Pine Barrens
Category Acreage Percent of Total
Vacant 35,260 37.7%
Recreation and Open Space 25,031 26.8%
Residential 11,599 12.4%
Institutional 10,410 11.1%
Agriculture 4,601 4.9%

The remaining six land use categories are the least significant in terms of acreage. These categories are transportation, commercial, utilities, industrial, surface waters, and waste handling and management. Together, they account for less than 7% of the land use in the Central Pine Barrens.

9.7.1 Core and Compatible Growth Areas

For parcels lying entirely within the Core Preservation Area, the recreation and open space category is the predominant land use category in terms of acreage, totalling 20,574 acres or 47.0% of the Core Preservation Area. Vacant land in the Core totals 15,694 acres or 35.8% of the area. Taken together, recreation and open space and vacant land account for over 80% of the land in the Core Preservation Area. Institutional uses rank a distant third in the Core Preservation Area, accounting for 3,293 acres or 7.5% of the acreage of parcels lying completely in the Core Preservation Area. Residential, utilities, and agricultural uses each account for two to three percent of the land of the parcels that are entirely in the Core.

Figure 9-9: Top Five Land Use Categories: Acreage and Percent of Total Land Area for Parcels in the Core Preservation Area
Category Acreage Percent of Total
Recreation and Open Space 20,574 47.0%
Vacant 15,694 35.8%
Institutional 3,293 7.5%
Residential 1,419 3.2%
Utilities 881 2.0%

The land use pattern in the Compatible Growth Area differs from that in the Core in two major ways. Residential use is a major land use in the Compatible Growth Area but not in the Core. Second, the recreation and open space category is much more dominant in the Core than in the Compatible Growth Area. While vacant land in the Compatible Growth Area is the predominant land use (15,029 acres or 41.5% of the area), residential uses account for 10,067 acres or 27.8% of the total. Agriculture, recreation and open space, each account for nearly 10% of the land in the Compatible Growth Area. Institutional, commercial, and industrial uses each account for two to three percent of the parcels entirely in the Compatible Growth Area.

Figure 9-10: Top Five Land Use Categories: Acreage and Percent of Total Land Area for Parcels in the Compatible Growth Area
Category Acreage Percent of Total
Vacant 15,029 41.5%
Residential 10,067 27.8%
Agriculture 3,551 9.8%
Recreation and Open Space 3,517 9.7%
Institutional 1,240 3.4%

Many of the parcels in the Central Pine Barrens planning area fall into both the Core and Compatible Growth Areas. Since the land use analysis was performed on the lot level, some difficulties arise when discussing land use in the Core versus the Compatible Growth Areas. In addition to the Core and Compatible Growth Areas, a third category was created for those parcels that fall into both the Core and Compatible Growth Areas.

The parcels falling into both the Core and Compatible Growth Areas total 13,435 acres. A large portion of that land comprises Brookhaven National Laboratory, and the sizeable acreage attributable to institutional use (5,878 acres or 43.8% of the acreage) reflects this fact. In addition, 33.8% of the land lying in parcels in both the Core and Compatible Growth Areas is vacant.

Figure 9-11: Top Five Land Use Categories: Acreage and Percent of Total Land Area for Parcels in Both the Compatible Growth Area and Core Preservation Area
Category Acreage Percent of Total
Institutional 5,878 43.8%
Vacant 4,537 33.8%
Transportation 1,302 9.7%
Recreation and Open Space 940 7.0%
Commercial 362 2.7%

The total acreage and percentage breakdown of all land uses by area is shown on the following tables.

Figure 9-12: All Land Use Categories: Acreage and Percent of Total Land Area in the Central Pine Barrens for the Core, Compatible Growth Area and Areas in Both the Core and Compatible Growth Areas
LAND USE CATEGORY CORE CGA CORE & CGA TOTAL
Acres Percent Acres Percent Acres Percent Acres Percent
griculture 856 2.0% 3,551 9.8% 195 1.4% 4,601 4.9%
Residential 1,419 3.2% 10,067 27.8% 113 0.8% 11,599 12.4%
Vacant 15,694 35.8% 15,029 41.5% 4,537 33.8% 35,260 37.7%
Commercial 451 1.0% 1,054 2.9% 362 2.7% 1,868 2.0%
Recreation and Open Space 20,574 47.0% 3,517 9.7% 940 7.0% 25,031 26.8%
Institutional 3,293 7.5% 1,240 3.4% 5,878 43.8% 10,410 11.1%
Industrial 55 0.1% 727 2.0% 104 0.8% 886 0.9%
Utilities 881 2.0% 257 0.7% 0 0.0% 1,138 1.2%
Transportation 125 0.3% 552 1.5% 1,302 9.7% 1,979 2.1%
Waste Handling & Management 1 0.0% 103 0.3% 0 0.0% 104 0.1%
Surface Waters 444 1.0% 146 0.4% 3 0.0% 593 0.6%
TOTAL 43793 100% 36243 100% 13435 100% 93470 100%

9.7.2 Vacant Land Analysis

Of the privately owned land in the Central Pine Barrens, 26,892 acres are vacant. This land is contained within 46 different zoning categories among the three Central Pine Barrens towns. Of the privately owned vacant land in the Central Pine Barrens, 77.0% is zoned residential and 18.7% is zoned industrial. The remaining 4.3% is zoned commercial, open space, or had no zoning category in the data base. Most of the industrially zoned vacant land is located in the Town of Riverhead (59%), and is primarily defense/institutional zoning at Calverton Airport. The following table shows the breakdown of zoning of vacant privately owned land by area.

Figure 9-13: Acreage of Vacant, Privately Owned Land in the Central Pine Barrens by General Zoning Category
RES. COMM. IND. OPEN SPACE UNKNOWN TOTAL
BROOKHAVEN TOWN
Core 5,461.03 43.78 0.00 0.00 0.00 5,504.81
CGA 7,790.57 440.58 1,266.60 0.00 595.93 10,093.68
Core & CGA 333.01 0.43 0.00 0.00 0.00 333.44
TOTAL 13,584.61 484.79 1,266.60 0.00 595.93 15,931.93
RIVERHEAD
Core 247.81 0.00 40.74 22.88 0.00 311.43
CGA 123.59 16.72 476.19 0.00 0.00 616.50
Core & CGA 73.00 2.40 2,451.00 0.00 0.00 2,526.40
TOTAL 444.40 19.12 2,967.93 22.88 0.00 3,454.33
SOUTHAMPTON
Core 3,683.53 0.00 749.09 3.88 1.00 4,437.50
CGA 1,728.94 2.99 49.34 0.00 13.10 1,794.37
Core & CGA 1,271.78 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.60 1,273.38
TOTAL 6,684.25 2.99 798.43 3.88 15.70 7,505.25
CENTRAL PINE BARRENS TOTAL
Core 9,392.37 43.78 789.83 26.76 1.00 10,253.74
CGA 9,643.10 460.29 1,792.13 0.00 609.03 12,504.55
Core & CGA 1,677.79 2.83 2,451.00 0.00 1.60 4,133.22
TOTAL 20,713.26 506.90 5,032.96 26.76 611.63 26,891.51

In the Central Pine Barrens, two thirds of the acreage of privately owned vacant land falls into four residential zones. Those zones are A1 residential (one acre lots), A2 residential (two acre lots), and A5 residential (5 acre lots) in Brookhaven and CR-200 (5 acre residential lots) in Southampton. A full 92% of the 10,254 acres of vacant privately owned parcels entirely within the Core Preservation Area are zoned residential, comprised of 33% zoned A5 residential (5 acre lots) in Brookhaven, 31% zoned CR-200 residential (200,000 square foot lots, about 5 acres) in Southampton and 15% zoned A2 residential (2 acre lots) in Brookhaven.

Based on existing zoning of privately owned land, the potential dwelling unit yield of this vacant land has been calculated. The number of lots per acre for each zoning lot size was obtained from Long Island Comprehensive Waste Treatment Management Plan, Long Island Regional Planning Board, 1978, Table 9-2, page 309. In these yield calculations, only aggregate acreage figures for each zoning category were considered. Specific lots and subdivisions were not analyzed for potential development or future subdivision. In addition, certain publicly owned parcels might be sold and developed for housing or other uses.

Based on exiting zoning of privately owned parcels, a potential for 10,287 additional housing units may be built on what is now privately owned vacant land zoned for residential use. This increase would represent an increase of 44% over the 1990 figure of 23,180. At saturation, therefore, the estimated number of housing units in the Central Pine Barrens is 33,467 units. The following table displays the breakdown of potential additional housing units by area within the Central Pine Barrens.

Figure 9-14: Potential Additional Housing Units Under Existing Residential Zoning of Privately Owned Vacant Land
Brookhaven Riverhead Southampton Pine Barrens Total
Core 2,054 102 800 2,956
CGA 5,191 103 1,022 6,316
Core and CGA 123  58 834 1,015
Pine Barrens Total 7,367 264 2,656  10,287

The largest number of potential additional housing units occurs in the Compatible Growth Area in Brookhaven, followed by the Core Preservation Area in Brookhaven. At an estimated 2.7 persons per household, the additional population is expected to be 27,775, for a total Central Pine Barrens population of 84,982 at saturation.
 

9.8 Infrastructure

9.8.1 Transportation

The majority of residents in the Pine Barrens and its periphery rely on automobiles for their transportation.

The number of employed residents of the total towns of Brookhaven, Riverhead, and Southampton was 226,447 according to the 1990 US Census. None of the 32 largest employment center areas in Nassau and Suffolk Counties lie within the Central Pine Barrens boundaries.

Major employment areas near the Central Pine Barrens are the Patchogue area, the Port Jefferson area, the Ronkonkoma area and the Stony Brook area. Total employment in each of these major employment centers exceeds 10,000, with employment in the Ronkonkoma area exceeding 25,000.

Employed residents of the Central Pine Barrens generally work in nearby major employment centers such as Ronkonkoma, Patchogue, Port Jefferson, Stony Brook, and Riverhead. Significant numbers of workers also travel to the Hauppauge and Brentwood/Central Islip employment centers.

Several noteworthy employment centers do exist within the Central Pine Barrens. The largest employment center in the area is the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). According to the 1990 Census, employment at the BNL site totalled nearly 4,000. Due to the Grumman Calverton Airport, 1990 employment in Calverton was also significant, exceeding 2,000 persons. Other employment concentrations of 1,000 or more workers existed in Rocky Point and Middle Island (primarily retail trade and educational service employment), Riverside, Coram, Medford, and Westhampton.

Of the employed residents of the entire towns of Brookhaven, Riverhead, and Southampton, 47% worked in their township of residence. A full 83% of these working residents were employed in Suffolk County.

Based on the 1990 Census data, it is projected that 80% of employed residents in the towns of Brookhaven, Riverhead, and Southampton drive to work alone. Another 11% carpool to work, 4% use public transit (such a bus or railroad), 2% walk, 2% work at home and the remaining persons use some other means to get to work.

9.8.2 Survey of Existing Thoroughfares

In the Pine Barrens four major thoroughfares provide road access in an east/west direction. They are:

1. N.Y.S. Route 495, Long Island Expressway (L.I.E). Volume ranges from 9,900 (1988) at the easterly terminus to 62,400 (1988), 60% of capacity, near the Horseblock Road exit (#65) in Medford. The major collector for the Expressway is William Floyd Parkway (C.R. 46) which contributes 26,800 cars (1992), followed by Port Jefferson-Westhampton Road (C.R. 111) and Patchogue-Yaphank Road (C.R. 101), which contribute 11,100 each (1989 and 1988 respectively).

2. N.Y.S. Route 27, Sunrise Highway. Volumes on various sections range from 16,300 (Annual Average Daily Traffic [AADT] 1986) at the easterly end of the pine barrens to 37,100 (AADT 1992) at the intersection of William Floyd Parkway (C.R. 46).

3. N.Y.S. Route 25A, North Country Road. Volumes range from 4900 (AADT 1988) at the easterly terminus in Calverton to 34,800 (AADT 1987) for the section between Miller Place- Patchogue Road and C.R. 83.

4. N.Y.S. Route 25, Middle Country Road (west of L.I.E.), River Road (East of L.I.E.). Volumes range from 6,750 (AADT 1981) at River Road to 31,600 (AADT 1992) between N.Y.S. Rte. 112 and C.R. 83; also includes C.R. 94 and N.Y.S. Rte. 24.

North-south roads that service the Pine Barrens and periphery include:

C.R. 83, Patchogue-Mt. Sinai Road
N.Y.S. Route 112, Port Jefferson-Patchogue Road
C.R. 21, Yaphank-Middle Island Road
C.R. 46, William Floyd Parkway
C.R. 25, Wading River-Manor Road
C.R. 111, Port Jefferson-Westhampton Road
C.R. 55, Eastport Road
C.R. 51, Moriches-Riverhead Road
C.R. 31, Old Riverhead Road
C.R. 104, Quogue-Riverhead Road

9.8.3 Traffic Analysis

A 1990 Traffic Volume to Capacity Report (Hurled 1990) contains the following data on the county roads in the pine barrens vicinity. This report was intended for quick assessments of current average daily traffic volumes for comparison with the theoretical capacities assigned to the County road system. The purpose is to ascertain, at a glance, sections of County road presently at, or exceeding, capacity. It is based on the following theoretical capacity values:

1 lane - 6000 vehicles per day
2 lanes - 12000 vehicles per day
3 lanes - 18000 vehicles per day
4 lanes - 24000 vehicles per day
4 lanes (divided) - 35000 vehicles per day
5 lanes - 30000 vehicles per day

In instances where a section of County road does not have a consistent number of lanes, the capacity was assessed using the most prevalent demarcation.

None of the frictional factors such as left lane turns, number of curb cuts, adjacent land use, stop signs or traffic signal green times have been factored into this report.

Field data would be necessary to determine actual level of service grades for all of the major roads. Models could then be run to predict degradation in levels of service and determine improvements required to handle future buildout in the Pine Barrens.

Preliminary data shows existing traffic problems located in the following areas:

1. Intersection of NYS Route 25 and NYS Route 112. Although a minor improvement is scheduled for this intersection (a jug handle will be installed at the corner) volume/capacity ratios for the segments of NYS Route 112 south of Route 25 indicate that this intersection is at its capacity. According to an official at N.Y.S. D.O.T. no improvements for the widening of N.Y.S. 112 are scheduled to occur during the next 7 or 8 years.

2. County Road 21 (Yaphank-Middle Island Road) between East Main Street and NYS Route 25. V/C ratios in this vicinity demonstrate this road may be at its handling capacity. Additional information is required from adjacent town roads which act as collectors and arterials. This roads include but not are limited to:

a. Mill Road (a.k.a. Coram-Yaphank Road)
b. Sills Road
c. Long Island Avenue
d. Potential Long Island Expressway Service Road & Ramps
e. Longwood Road
f. Bartlett Road
g. Yaphank-Middle Island Road

The 1990 report was meant to be the first step in the analysis of the transportation impacts of the Pine Barrens Protection Plan. Future traffic analyses could include, but not be limited to:

1. Analysis of all major town roads.
2. Potential expansions of L.I.E. service roads and ramps.
3. Various buildout scenarios and buildout timing scenarios.
4. Existing and proposed level of service maps.
5. Frictional effects on road capacity including grade changes, left lane turns, numbers and types of curb cuts, adjacent land uses, traffic control devices, percent of trucks and buses, etc.

9.8.4 Currently Proposed Suffolk County Department of Public Works Road Improvements (SCDPW)

The Department has one project, C.R. 21, Rocky Point - Yaphank Road at Mill Road, within this area. This project is presently in the planning stage. SEQRA review of the project is mandates. It may also be necessary to acquire permits from applicable environmental agencies prior to preceding with this project.

9.8.5 Potential Areas of Traffic Concern

Given the continuing growth of the South Fork, it may be necessary to increase capacity at the L.I.E./C.R. 111 intersection. Likewise, with increasing delays along C.R. 58, (Old Country Road), North Fork traffic will begin using C.R. 94, Nugent Drive in greater numbers. Consequently, potential problems could arise at the L.I.E./C.R. 94 intersection. County Road 111 is located in the Compatible Growth Area, and C.R. 94 is within the Core Preservation Area.

A northerly segment of C.R. 111, Port Jefferson-Westhampton Road from Miller Place-Yaphank Road to Hollow Road is in the Core Preservation Area. This segment is immediately east of the portion of the C.R. 111 right-of-way (Hollow Road to the L.I.E.) that was dedicated to the County Nature Preserve (Res. 583-88). As a result of this dedication, the original proposed section of C.R. 111 from N.Y.S. Route 25A to the L.I.E. cannot be constructed. However, if future conditions warrant, improvements could be made from N.Y.S. Rte. 25A to C.R. 21, Yaphank-Rocky Point Road.

The volume of traffic along C.R. 21, Rocky Point - Yaphank Road from Mill Road to N.Y.S. Route 25 has increased 40% over the last eight years. Similarly, the segment between N.Y.S. Route 25 and N.Y.S. Route 25A has experienced a 12% increase between 1985 and 1989. If this trend continues, it will be necessary to increase highway capacity along this roadway. C.R. 8, Yaphank By-Pass was originally proposed as an alternate to reconstructing C.R. 21 and was endorsed by the Suffolk County Department of Public Works. However, this project never progressed due to environmental concerns, community opposition and lack of funding. The proposed alignment of C.R. 8 is entirely within the Compatible Growth Area, except for a small segment that passes through the Core Preservation Area near Cathedral Pines County Park.

Appendix 5-1 contains vehicle count ratios and volume growth rates for county roads in the Central Pine Barrens and Appendix 5-2 contains vehicle county at peak hours for state roads within the Central Pine Barrens. This data was supplied by Suffolk County Department of Public Works and N.Y.S. Department of Transportation.

9.8.6 Sewage Treatment Facilities in the Central Pine Barrens

The following comments are offered by the Department of Public Works (Hayduk 1993) concerning the impact of the Pine Barrens legislation on Public Works.

Land use regulations are critical in the design of sewage treatment plants. There is a direct ratio between intensity of land use and volume of effluent. Consequently, any change in land use within a County Sewer District or in treatment standards would have a major impact on the collection and treatment systems of a sewer district.

All of the proposed Sewer District No. 16 (Whispering Pines) falls within the Long Island Central Pine Barrens Area. A significant undeveloped portion of this district lies within the Core Preservation Area. Since the actual formation of the district will not begin until the developer has completed his project(s), only those projects permitted to construct will be incorporated within S.D. No. 16.

Sewer District No. 8 (Strathmore Ridge) and the Dorade Treatment Plant (future S.D. 16 - Whispering Pines Plant) are within the Compatible Growth Area. The proposed alignment of the force main connection from S.D. No. 8 to the Dorade Treatment Plant requires that it pass through the Core Preservation Area.

All of the proposed Sewer Districts No. 17 (Ridgehaven) and No. 20 (Leisure Village) are within the Compatible Growth Area. These are established subdivisions with operating treatment plants that should not be impacted by this legislation. It is important to note that within Leisure Village there still remains the potential to construct another 267 units.

The Department of Public Works (Wright 1994) has also provided a list of sewage treatment plants within or adjacent to the pine barrens. They have also included excess capacities and a location map. Suffolk County Department of Health Services participated in the collection of this data. This data is included in Appendix 5-3.
 
 
9.9 Bibliography: Physical Data

Hayduk, Stephen G., Impact of the Pine Barrens Legislation on Public Works. Memorandum to Robert J. Cimino (County Attorney) dated September 1, 1993.

Hayduk, Stephen G., 1992 Traffic Volume Report - Suffolk County Roads. Suffolk County Department of Public Works, Traffic Control and Engineering Division, Yaphank, New York, 1992.

Hurled, Joseph P., 1990 Traffic Volume to Capacity Report - Suffolk County Roads. Suffolk County Department of Public Works, Yaphank, New York, 1990.

Long Island Lighting Company. 1993 Long Island Population Survey. 1993.

Long Island Regional Planning Board. Census Tract Maps, 1960, 1970, 1980, 1990.

Long Island Regional Planning Board. Land Use 1981.

Suffolk County Planning Department. Database of multi-unit housing complexes. 1994.

Suffolk County Water Authority. Pine Barrens Zones as of 12/29/93. Map showing lot boundaries and Core and Compatible Growth Area boundaries. 1994.

Suffolk County Water Authority. Land Use in the Pine Barrens. Work map. 1994.

U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. Census block maps, 1990.

U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. Data from the 1960, 1970, 1980 and 1990 U.S. Censuses.

Wright, Ben, Pine Barrens/Sewage Treatment Facilities. Memorandum to James Bagg (Council on Environmental Quality) dated July 7, 1994.